It was one of those hot silent

It was one of those hot, silent nights, when people sit at windows, listening for the thunder which they know will shortly break; when they recall dismal tales of hurricanes and earthquakes; and of lonely travellers on open plains, and lonely ships at sea, struck by lightning.  ~Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter XLII

But the true lover of rain has

But the true lover of rain…. has a deep inner enjoyment of the rain, as rain, and his sense of its beauty drinks it in as thirstily as does the drinking earth. It refreshes and cools his heart and brain; he longs to go forth into the fields, to feel its steady stream, to scent its fragrance; to stand under some heavy-foilaged chestnut-tree, and hear the rushing music on the crowded leaves. ~John Richard Vernon, “The Beauty of Rain,” 1863TPVgb, Qe2

It had been gradually getting overcast and

It had been gradually getting overcast, and now the sky was dark and lowering, save where the glory of the departing sun piled up masses of gold and burning fire, decaying embers of which gleamed here and there through the black veil, and shone redly down upon the earth.  The wind began to moan in hollow murmurs, as the sun went down, carrying glad day elsewhere; and a train of dull clouds coming up against it, menaced thunder and lightning.  Large drops of rain soon began to fall, and, as the storm-clouds came sailing onward, others supplied the void they left behind and spread over all the sky.  Then was heard the low rumbling of distant thunder, then the lightning quivered, and then the darkness of an hour seemed to have gathered in an instant.  ~Charles Dickens, Old Curiosity Shop

There is nothing in the world more

There is nothing in the world more beautiful than the forest clothed to its very hollows in snow.  It is the still ecstasy of nature, wherein every spray, every blade of grass, every spire of reed, every intricacy of twig, is clad with radiance.  ~William Sharp

Slowly at last the heavy clouds charged

Slowly at last the heavy clouds, charged with the welcome water, roll up from seaward; the air grows sultry and still; the creatures of the grove and jungle keep their coverts, as if expectant, like the surface of the soil; there is a hush over all things, as though nature herself were faint; till presently the lightning flashes and the thunder rattles, and down, as if really from heaven and from the hand of God, comes the thick and fresh rain. Then there rises from the ground a cool and penetrating aroma, the scent of the dry soil saturated… ~Daily Telegraph, quoted in A Cyclop?dia of Nature Teachings, 1892TPVgb reprinted

Now and then there comes a crash

Now and then there comes a crash of thunder in a storm, and we look up with amazement when he sets the heavens on a blaze with his lightning. ~C.H. SpurgeonTPVgb reprinted

The substance of the winds is too

The substance of the winds is too thin for human eyes, their written language is too difficult for human minds, and their spoken language mostly too faint for the ears.  ~John Muir

Theres always a period of curious fear

There’s always a period of curious fear between the first sweet-smelling breeze and the time when the rain comes cracking down.  ~Don DelilloJames Axton, in “The Names,” ch12, 1982

It is beautiful when it rains far

It is beautiful when it rains far away in the distance, the bright sun shining on the mound on which you stand, and only a few guerilla drops heralding the approach of the shower towards you. ~John Richard Vernon, “The Beauty of Rain,” 1863TPVgb, Qe2

Spooky wild and gusty swirling dervishes of

Spooky wild and gusty; swirling dervishes of rattling leaves race by, fleeing the windflung deadwood that cracks and thumps behind.  ~Dave Beardtwitter.com/Raqhun/status/5658364561

The crisp drenching rustle from the dry

The crisp drenching rustle from the dry foliage of the perceptibly grateful trees… the little plants, in speechless ecstasy, receiving cupful after cupful into the outspread leaves, that silently empty their gracious load, time after time, into the still expecting roots, and open their hands still for more. ~John Richard Vernon, “The Beauty of Rain,” 1863TPVgb, Qe2

The snow itself is lonely or if

The snow itself is lonely or, if you prefer, self-sufficient.  There is no other time when the whole world seems composed of one thing and one thing only.  ~Joseph Wood Krutch

Out of the bosom air cloud folds her

Out of the bosom of the Air,
Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken,
Over the woodlands brown and bare,
Over the harvest-fields forsaken,
Silent, and soft, and slow
Descends the snow.
~Henry Wadsworth LongfellowSnow-Flakes

Many a man curses the rain that

Many a man curses the rain that falls upon his head, and knows not that it brings abundance to drive away the hunger.  ~Saint Basil

Nature has no mercy at all says

Nature has no mercy at all.  Nature says, "I’m going to snow.  If you have on a bikini and no snowshoes, that’s tough.  I am going to snow anyway."  ~Maya Angelou

The clouds were flying fast the wind

The clouds were flying fast, the wind was coming up in gusts, banging some neighboring shutters that had broken loose, twirling the rusty chimney-cowls and weathercocks, and rushing round and round a confined adjacent churchyard as if it had a mind to blow the dead citizens out of their graves.  The low thunder, muttering in all quarters of the sky at once, seemed to threaten vengeance for this attempted desecration, and to mutter, "Let them rest! Let them rest!"  ~Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit

There are times when the elements being

There are times when, the elements being in unusual commotion, those who are bent on daring enterprises, or agitated by great thoughts, whether of good or evil, feel a mysterious sympathy with the tumult of nature, and are roused into corresponding violence.  In the midst of thunder, lightning, and storm, many tremendous deeds have been committed; men, self-possessed before, have given a sudden loose to passions they could no longer control.  The demons of wrath and despair have striven to emulate those who ride the whirlwind and direct the storm; and man, lashed into madness with the roaring winds and boiling waters, has become for the time as wild and merciless as the elements themselves.  ~Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge

O the snow beautiful filling sky and

O the snow, the beautiful snow,
Filling the sky and earth below;
Over the house-tops, over the street,
Over the heads of the people you meet,
Dancing, flirting, skimming along.
~James W. WatsonBeautiful Snow

The first fall of snow is not

The first fall of snow is not only an event, it is a magical event.  You go to bed in one kind of world and wake up in another quite different, and if this is not enchantment then where is it to be found?  ~J.B. Priestley

He had been eight years upon a

He had been eight years upon a project for extracting sunbeams out of cucumbers, which were to be put into vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the air in raw, inclement summers.  ~Jonathan Swift

Louder and louder the deep thunder rolled

Louder and louder the deep thunder rolled, as through the myriad halls of some vast temple in the sky; fiercer and brighter came the lightning; more and more heavily the rain poured down.  The eye, partaking of the quickness of the flashing light, saw in its every gleam a multitude of objects which it could not see at steady noon in fifty times that period…. in a trembling, vivid, flickering instant, everything was clear and plain: then came a flash of red into the yellow light; a change to blue; a brightness so intense that there was nothing else but light; and then the deepest and profoundest darkness.  ~Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter XLII