She paced the staircase gallery outside looked out

Florence could not read, or rest a moment. She paced her own room, opened the door and paced the staircase-gallery outside…[S]he… paced the staircase-gallery outside, looked out of the window on the night, listened to the wind blowing and the rain falling, sat down and watched the faces in the fire, got up and watched the moon flying like a storm-driven ship through the sea of clouds.  ~Charles Dickens, Dombey and SonTPV reprinted version

Look up what is that apparition of

Look up! What is that apparition of dazzling brightness rising softly upon the blue sky from behind those tall and massive elms? If you saw it for the first time in your life, you would say it must be some celestial visitant. Is it light itself from heaven taking shape, and just softened and subdued to teh endurance of a mortal vision? It is nothing but a cloud!?mere vapour that the unseen wind moves and moulds, and that the sun shines on for a little time. ~William Smith, Gravenhurst, or Thoughts on Good and Evil, 1862TPVgb, Qe2

It had been gradually getting overcast and

It had been gradually getting overcast, and now the sky was dark and lowering, save where the glory of the departing sun piled up masses of gold and burning fire, decaying embers of which gleamed here and there through the black veil, and shone redly down upon the earth.  The wind began to moan in hollow murmurs, as the sun went down, carrying glad day elsewhere; and a train of dull clouds coming up against it, menaced thunder and lightning.  Large drops of rain soon began to fall, and, as the storm-clouds came sailing onward, others supplied the void they left behind and spread over all the sky.  Then was heard the low rumbling of distant thunder, then the lightning quivered, and then the darkness of an hour seemed to have gathered in an instant.  ~Charles Dickens, Old Curiosity Shop

The clouds were drifting over the moon

The clouds were drifting over the moon at their giddiest speed, at one time wholly obscuring her, at another, suffering her to burst forth in full splendor and shed her light on all the objects around; anon, driving over her again, with increased velocity, and shrouding everything in darkness.  ~Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

Louder and louder the deep thunder rolled

Louder and louder the deep thunder rolled, as through the myriad halls of some vast temple in the sky; fiercer and brighter came the lightning; more and more heavily the rain poured down.  The eye, partaking of the quickness of the flashing light, saw in its every gleam a multitude of objects which it could not see at steady noon in fifty times that period…. in a trembling, vivid, flickering instant, everything was clear and plain: then came a flash of red into the yellow light; a change to blue; a brightness so intense that there was nothing else but light; and then the deepest and profoundest darkness.  ~Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter XLII