I remember a hundred lovely lakes and

I remember a hundred lovely lakes, and recall the fragrant breath of pine and fir and cedar and poplar trees.  The trail has strung upon it, as upon a thread of silk, opalescent dawns and saffron sunsets.  It has given me blessed release from care and worry and the troubled thinking of our modern day.  It has been a return to the primitive and the peaceful.  Whenever the pressure of our complex city life thins my blood and benumbs my brain, I seek relief in the trail; and when I hear the coyote wailing to the yellow dawn, my cares fall from me – I am happy.  ~Hamlin Garland, McClure’s, February 1899

But when the spirit speaksor beauty from

…but when
The Spirit speaks,?or beauty from the sky
Descends into my being,?when I hear
The storm-hymns of the mighty ocean roll,
Or thunder sound,?the champion of the storm!?
Then I feel envy for immortal words,
The rush of living thought; oh! then I long
To dash my feelings into deathless verse,
That may administer to unborn time,
And tell some lofty soul how I have lived
A worshipper of Nature and of Thee!
~Robert Montgomery, “Death,” A Universal Prayer; Death; A Vision of Heaven; and A Vision of Hell; &c. &c., 1829TPVgb, QE2

I know the thrill of grasses when

I know the thrill of the grasses when the rain pours over them.
I know the trembling of the leaves when the winds sweep through them.
I know what the white clover felt as it held a drop of dew pressed close in its beauteousness.
I know the quivering of the fragrant petals at the touch of the pollen-legged bees.
I know what the stream said to the dipping willows, and what the moon said to the sweet lavender.
I know what the stars said when they came stealthily down and crept fondly into the tops of the trees.
~Muriel Strode, "Creation Songs"

There is not a creature unacquainted with

There is not a creature unacquainted with gratification, in some shape or another. All derive it from the circumstances amid which they exist, which fact quietly suggests to us that the purest and most lasting pleasures are to be found at our very feet,? that they are not necessarily the fruit of toil and outlay, but that they flow to us out of the very nature of things, if we will but be content with what is simple and genuine…. The foot that is familiar with the grass belongs usually to a man of lighter heart than he whose soles seldom wander from the pavement; and the best elixir vit? is a run, as often as we can contrive it, amid the sweets of new and lovely scenery, where nature sits, fresh from the hand of the Creator, almost chiding us for our delay. ~Leo Hartley Grindon, “Insects,” The Little Things of Nature: Considered Especially in Relation to the Divine Benevolence, 1865TPVgb, 2nd ed, 1866; Leopold Hartley Grindon (British educator & botanist, 1818-1904); Qe2

Nature rejuvenates so quickly completely though we

Nature rejuvenates so quickly, so completely.  Though we often view ourselves otherwise, we are nature.  ~Jeb Dickerson, www.howtomatter.comnature rejuvenates so quickly, so completely. tho we often view Rselves otherwise, WE r nature. i am the budding cottonwood. spring cometh. 23rd may 2009 twitter.com/JebDickerson/status/1894462447