As hungry as the sea and can

There is no woman’s sides.
Can bide the beating of so strong a passion,
As love doth give my heart: no woman’s heart
So big, to hold so much, they lack retention.
Alas, their love may be call’d appetite,
No motion of the Liver, but the Pallate,
That suffer surfeit, cloyment, and revolt,
But mine is all [A]s hungry as the Sea,
And can digest as much…, make no compare
Between that love a woman can bear me,
And that I owe Olivia.
~William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night  (Note: Out of context, this is actually referring to heart/capacity for love)

Lettuce greens and celery though much eaten

Lettuce, greens and celery, though much eaten, are worse than cabbage, being equally indigestible without the addition of condiments.  Besides, the lettuce contains narcotic properties.  It is said of Galen, that he used to obtain from a head of it, eaten on going to bed, all the good effects of a dose of opium.  ~William Andrus Alcott, The Young House-keeper: or, Thoughts on Food and Cookery, 1838TPV

Breadbaking is one of those almost hypnotic

[Breadbaking is] one of those almost hypnotic businesses, like a dance from some ancient ceremony.  It leaves you filled with one of the world’s sweetest smells… there is no chiropractic treatment, no Yoga exercise, no hour of meditation in a music-throbbing chapel, that will leave you emptier of bad thoughts than this homely ceremony of making bread.  ~M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating

Greens too have a complex history in

END SPICY FOODS

GREENS
Greens too have a complex history in the South.  They were something that people could go and gather after working a long shift at the factory.  So although greens were one of the earlier items to be canned and sold, people didn’t choose to spend their grocery money on them when they first had money to do so.  "Greens can be seen as a protest against the time clock that industrialization introduced," Engelhardt says.  "Gathering greens served as a means for both men and women to resist new factory and mine-driven gender roles, as a walk in the woods did not involve company scrip or time clock."  ~Vivé Griffith, "You Are What You Eat: Dr. Elizabeth Engelhardt studies how your food choices can carry stories of race, class and culture," 2005www.appalachianhistory.net/2010/11/cornbread-or-beaten-biscuits-breaking-the-food-code.html, TPV

Stored away in some brain cell is

Stored away in some brain cell is the image of a long-departed aunt you haven’t thought of in 30 years.  Stored away in another cell is the image of a pink pony stitched on your first set of baby pajamas.  All it takes to get that aunt mounted on the back of that pony is to eat a hunk of meatloaf immediately before going to bed.  ~Robert Brault, www.robertbrault.com

And i find chopsticks frankly distressing am

And I find chopsticks frankly distressing.  Am I alone in thinking it odd that a people ingenious enough to invent paper, gunpowder, kites and any number of other useful objects, and who have a noble history extending back 3,000 years haven’t yet worked out that a pair of knitting needles is no way to capture food?  ~Bill Bryson