The movie the graduate was talking about

It[The movie The Graduate] was talking about that moment in time when you have this world of possibilities, all these expectations, and you don’t know who it is you’re supposed to be.  And you choose this one path, Mrs. Robinson, and it turns out to be bleak, but it’s part of your initiation, your trial by fire.  And then, by choosing the wrong path, you find your way onto the right path, but you’ve created this mess.  Fight Club is the Nineties inverse of that:  a guy who does not have a world of possibilities in front of him, he has no possibilities, he literally cannot imagine a way to change his life.  ~David Fincher, director of Fight Club, interview with Gavin Smith, "Inside Out," Film Comment, Sep/Oct 1999

By this time next week each guy

By this time next week, each guy on the Assault Committee has to pick a fight where he won’t come out a hero.  And not in fight club.  This is harder than it sounds.  A man on the street will do anything not to fight.  The idea is to take some Joe on the street who’s never been in a fight and recruit him.  Let him experience winning for the first time in his life.  Get him to explode.  Give him permission to beat the crap out of you.  You can take it.  If you win, you screwed up.  "What we have to do, people," Tyler told the committee, "is remind these guys what kind of power they still have."  ~Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club, Chapter 16

You arent alive anywhere like youre at

You aren’t alive anywhere like you’re alive at fight club…. Fight club isn’t about winning or losing fights.  Fight club isn’t about words.  You see a guy come to fight club for the first time, and his ass is a loaf of white bread.  You see this same guy here six months later, and he looks carved out of wood.  This guy trusts himself to handle anything.  There’s grunting and noise at fight club like at the gym, but fight club isn’t about looking good.  There’s hysterical shouting in tongues like at church, and when you wake up Sunday afternoon you feel saved.  ~Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club, Chapter 6

You buy furniture tell yourself this is

You buy furniture.  You tell yourself, this is the last sofa I will ever need in my life.  Buy the sofa, then for a couple years you’re satisfied that no matter what goes wrong, at least you’ve got your sofa issue handled.  Then the right set of dishes.  Then the perfect bed.  The drapes.  The rug.  Then you’re trapped in your lovely nest, and the things you used to own, now they own you.  ~Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club, Chapter 5